IANPHI Members Among Many Fighting the War Against Malaria

By Catherine Witherspoon | April 24, 2018

To help farmers in Cameroon use their mosquito nets two colleagues in Cameroon worked to design and record a mosquito net transformation video using the languages of English, French, and Pidgin. The video demonstrates how to successfully change a square net into a round one, which makes it easier to hang on a tree from one tie. This supports farmers to use a net when sleeping in the fields after work during harvest season. The 10-minute video gives step-by-step instructions to change a net and is designed to be used by malaria prevention health educators in rural areas. Photo Credit: "Net Transformation" by Kate Mishkin Rollins School of Public Health, Location: Cameroon
Two colleagues in Cameroon worked to design and record a mosquito net transformation video using the languages of English, French, and Pidgin. The 10-minute instructional video demonstrated how to change a square net into a round one, which makes it easier to hang on a tree from one tie. The video also helped farmers properly use a net to protect themselves from malaria when sleeping in the fields after work during harvest season. Photo Credit: "Net Transformation" by Kate Mishkin Rollins School of Public Health, Location: Cameroon

Malaria, a mosquito-borne disease caused by the Plasmodium parasite, is one of the ten oldest known infectious diseases affecting humans today. Individuals who are most susceptible to the disease live in poor tropical and subtropical areas of the world. When infected, many experience a fever, chills, and flu-like symptoms. While preventable and curable, if malaria is left untreated, it can lead to death.  

People are still dying from malaria at an alarming rate. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 91 countries reported 216 million cases of malaria in 2016. In the same year, the disease claimed the lives of approximately 445,000 men, women, and children around the world. Africa has the highest rate of malaria infections and deaths than anywhere in the world. The continent carried 90% of the malaria cases reported and 91% of the deaths caused by the disease. But there has been some progress.  

The World malaria report 2017 states that the rate of new malaria cases fell by 21% globally, and the death rates dropped by 29% between 2010 and 2015. Despite the significant progress made to date, malaria deaths and infections remain a significant threat to the global health community and to the world. Many programs, governments, and entities, including many IANPHI members are working to improve public health capacity to tackle this pressing problem.    

On April 25th, World Malaria Day, IANPHI joins the world in bringing attention to the need to reduce the number of malaria infections and deaths by increasing funding for controlling and eliminating this disease. 

To save more lives and persist in the progress to control malaria we must get ready to beat malaria, for good, before it beats us.

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